The “New” Education Vocabulary

Diving into the world of education can sometimes feel like learning a new language. From “emotional literacy” to “Culturally Responsive Teaching,” the vocabulary of teaching and learning is ever-expanding, reflecting the dynamic nature of the field. That’s why this friendly glossary has been put together. Think of it as an educational compass, guiding you through

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What is loose parts play?

Loose parts play refers to a style of play that involves open-ended materials or objects that can be manipulated, moved, and combined in countless ways by children. These materials are called “loose parts” because they are not fixed or limited in their use. They can be anything from natural elements like sticks, stones, and leaves to everyday objects such as buttons, fabric scraps, or empty

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8 of the Best Spooky Artworks in Art History

Why should art always dance in the sunlight, wrapped in vivid hues and playful strokes? As autumn’s chill creeps in and shadows lengthen, a world of art is waiting in the twilight. It’s spooky season, after all!So, let’s captivate the young, curious minds with some of the eeriest, most mysterious, and haunting artworks in art

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How to make color theory actually fun

AKA, how to take one of the least creative bits of art education and make it inspiring.  The issue with teaching color theory (most times) While color theory is definitely significant in art practice, the actual argument has arguably more to do with science than with art. This is to say, that color theory classes

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What is the Reggio Emilia Approach? | Intro to Reggio Emilia Teaching for Parents and Teachers

The Reggio Emilia approach is an innovative teaching philosophy that emphasizes creativity, collaboration, and community. This method was created by Loris Malaguzzi and a group of parents in Reggio Emilia, Italy, after World War II. It is known globally for its focus on children’s learning. [ref] “Three Approaches from Europe: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia,” Carolyn

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